Joint Contributions of Civil Society Organizations from Latin America to NetMundial

Abstract

Civil Society Organizations from across Latin America join to add their contributions to the Net Mundial meeting.It is important to Civil Society Organizations from Latin-America to express our point of view about the future of Internet Governance because we are a relevant component of the Internet Governance Ecosystem and the region where part of the next 2-other-billion Internet users are going to come from.Considering this, we have to build the road in our Region for the future, enhancing cooperation in infrastructure and capacity building among others, so those users can participate in the Internet Ecosystem in a more informed and qualified manner. For all those reasons, we think it is important that the voice of the Civil Society Organizations from Latin America shall be heard and involved in the discussion of the Set of Internet Governance Principles and the Roadmap for the future evolution of the Internet Governance Ecosystem.

Document

Joint Contributions of Civil Society Organizations from Latin America to NetMundial

 

Abstract

 

Civil Society Organizations from across Latin America join to add their contributions to the Net Mundial meeting.

 

It is important to Civil Society Organizations from Latin-America to express ourpoint of view about the future of Internet Governance because we are a relevant component of the Internet Governance Ecosystem and the region where part of the next 2-other-billion Internet users are going to come from.

 

Considering this, we have to build the road in our Region for the future, enhancing cooperation in infrastructure and capacity building among others, so those users can participate in the Internet Ecosystem in a more informed and qualified manner.

 

For all those reasons, we think it is important that the voice of the Civil Society Organizations from Latin America shall be heard and involved in the discussion of the Set of Internet Governance Principles and the Roadmap for the future evolution of the Internet Governance Ecosystem.

 

Content Contribution:

 

Introduction

 

The members of the Civil Society Organization Network of Latin America thank the Government of Brazil in coordination with the global Internet community, for the opportunity to participate and make contributions to the Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the future of Internet Governance.

 

Latin America represents 48.2% of Internet users from the Americas, with an average penetration of almost 40%, which is higher than the general worldwide penetration rate [1]. Latin America had the fastest-growing Internet population of all regions in the world, growing 12 percent between 2012 and 2013, and reaching more than 147 million unique web visitors as of last March. Latin America is also an important space for economic and social innovation, with the massive presence and use of social networks. Latin America is an incredible environment of creativity and social mobilization, with increasing expert capacity regarding the knowledge and skills that are needed to fulfill the goals of the information society.

 

However, the challenges in the region are still significant when addressing the evolving Internet ecosystem thatwhichmust take into consideration the rights of a variety of stakeholders. During the past few years in Latin America, we have witnessed the emergence of laws and policies that violate core digital rights.In several of those instances, such laws and policies were developed in a non-transparent non-accountable environment, without proper consultation with all affected parties. Thus, it is crucial to present our proposals to this consultativeprocess. We hope to see the results of Net Mundial as a positive way forward for the development of the Internet, and the guarantee of digital and human rights in the region.

 

Considering this, we have to build the road in our Region for the future, enhancing cooperation in infrastructure and capacity building among others, so those users can participate in the Internet Ecosystem in a more informed and qualified manner.

 

It is important that the voice of the Civil Society Organizations from Latin America is heardand involved in the discussion of the Set of Internet Governance Principles and the Roadmap for the future evolution of the Internet Governance Ecosystem.

 

1. Set of Internet Governance Principles

 

To begin, we must define Internet Governance:

 

Internet governance is the development and application by Governments, the private sector and civil society, in their respective roles, of shared principles, norms, rules, decision-making procedures, and programmes that shape the evolution and use of the Internet (Working Definition of World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).

 

As members of Civil Society Organizations of Latin America, exercising our role in the Internet Governance Ecosystem, we defend the Internet as it was designed in the beginning, as open, interoperable, decentralized, inclusive, unique, democratic, participative, global, transparent, equal, neutral, free, innovative and, respectful of human rights and rule of laws.

 

We fully support several sets of Internet Governance Principles that have already been elaborated. According to the nature of Internet and the development of Latin America, we consider appropriate and adequate for our region to emphasize our adherence to the following principles, without diminishing any others:

 

1. RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL, 20/8 THE PROMOTION, PROTECTION AND ENJOYMENT OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS ON THE INTERNET[2]

 

Affirms that the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online, in particular freedom of expression, which is applicable regardless of frontiers and through any media of one’s choice, in accordance with articles 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

 

2. OCDE[3]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. PRINCIPLES FOR THE GOVERNANCE AND USE OF THE INTERNET - CGI.br[4]

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. APC INTERNET RIGHTS CHARTER[5]

 

 

 

 

 

2. Roadmap for the further evolution of the Internet Governance Ecosystem

 

As Civil Society Organizations trying to fulfill our role in the Internet Governance Ecosystem and guided by the regional perspective, we want to highlight the road that has to be built in our Region in order to comply with the principles cited above.

 

1. Multi-stakeholder Model

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Capacity Building and Technical Assistance

 

The major necessity in our region is capacity building on Internet Governance Issues. Its natural home is the Academy. When the Academy fails on building capacity it’s Civil Society, the Government, or individual experts the ones fulfilling this need. For these objectives it’s essential to build a pool of regional trainers, and an online learning platform to provide this services in all the languages of the region in collaboration with regional and global I* organizations.

 

Capacity building is also important for increasing government participation in all of these fora. By building capacity in government representatives, the public policy discussion agenda will immediately increase and improve. Investing on continued capacity building is a way to assure continuous participation, discussion and national representation of governments in the global discussion.

 

3. Access

 

 

 

4. Inclusion and Diversity

 

We emphasize the need to invest in access and infrastructure to achieve and guarantee true inclusion and diversity forchildren, youth, adults, elders, indigenous, women, disabled people, and the respect for multilingualism, multiculturalism and the preservation of oral cultures.

 

5. Respect of Human Rights

 

Given the recent acts of telecommunications mass surveillance where the human rights of worldwide citizens were violated, and recalling the DO NO HARM fundamental principle, we urge the governments of the region to respect international human rights adopted in international law where the countries of our region are signatories.

 

Taking into account the topology of the network, it is imperative to make greater efforts to respect and defend freedom of expression and privacy; avoiding censorship or self-censorship, arbitrary online content blocking without a order by a competent judicial authority, decreasing Internet connection speed as a sanction, mass surveillance a order by a competent judicial authority, and promoting the non-infringement control of such rights by Internet service and content providers. To protect these rights it’s essential for Civil Society to continue to supervise the State role and at the same time, for the State to superviseprivate companies. Furthermore, to strengthen these rights protection, it is necessary that State and Civil Society take actions to restore the trust in the Internet ecosystem that users lost as a result of recent events.

 

6. Development

 

Our region still needs a lot of investment for development, for this reason it is necessary to promote and encourage ICT’s that result in the desired economic development, creating new business models; to foster the DNS industry in our region, Green ICT development and the development of technical skills to bring responsiveness and innovation in the event of natural disasters thus responding to incidents that affect the stability, resilience and robustness of the network, while also reinforcing the activity of CERT/CSIRT. In order to promote development, the region's governments should promote tax, legal and educational incentives.

 

7. Participation

 

Regional participation in Internet Governance global spaces is still low. To increase this participation we suggest the creation of a multistakeholder body responsible for raising funds and its administration, with the aim to facilitate the involvement of national representatives, from different sectors in different Internet Governance areas, ensuring the participation on equal footing. On the other hand, we suggest to improve remote participation in these spaces, taking into account the bandwidth requirements of the participating users. To this end, the creation of Remote Participation Centers for each of these meetings is needed. These Centers should be permanently available in the languages of the region, without neglecting the creation of participation Hubs at national level in charge of the different stakeholders. This remote participation service must meet the accessibility requirements for an equal and inclusive participation.

 

We observe a lack of participation of communicators and journalists specialized and skilled on issues of Internet Governance, which makes the message communicated not to meet the requirements of clear, attractive, innovative, simple and friendly communication manner for beginners and newcomers.

 

Another participation deficit we observe is the low presence of young people in regional and global Internet Governance spaces. To increase this participation, we suggest looking for new meeting formats making them attractive, innovative, creative and tailored to the needs and expectations of the future Internet leaders.

 

We continue to observe that in our region there are spaces dedicated to the participation of governments, such as ECLAC, where Civil Society is only granted the observer status. We recommend to arbitrate the necessary measures to allow participation in an equal footing to the different regional stakeholders in these similar spaces that still continue to prevent a real and effective participation, especially for Civil Society Organizations.

 

8. Respect for the Rule of Law

 

Rule of law should be respected in all the activities addressed to discuss, organize and implement actions on the future of Internet governance by all stakeholders involved. This is in relation with the training activities mentioned above, and aimed at judicial officials, lawyers and judges in charge of enforcing the various national, regional and international laws related to the Internet ecosystem. Also the different stakeholders of our region, especially our governments must assure access to digital justice and promote the implementation of online dispute resolution mechanisms.

 

[1] http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats2.htm

 

[2] http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/RESOLUTION/GEN/G12/153/25/PDF/G1215325.pdf?OpenElement

 

[3] http://www.oecd.org/internet/innovation/48289796.pdf

 

[4] http://www.cgi.br/english/regulations/resolution2009-003.htm

 

[5] http://www.apc.org/en/system/files/APC_charter_EN_0.pdf

 

Names and Signatory Individuals and Organizations

 

-Gonzalo A Romero B, Colombia, Individual

 

-Esther Lizana , Perú, UNP

 

.Humberto Carrasco, Chile, ADI - Chile

 

-Aída Noblia, Uruguay, Asociación de Escribanos del Uruguay

 

-Roxana Laura Goldstein, Argentina , Individual

 

-Edna Samudio, Panamá, ISOC Panamá (en formación)

 

-Francisco Vera, Chile, ONG Derechos Digitales

 

-Pilar Saenz, Colombia, Fundación Karisma

 

-Julian Casasbuenas G., Colombia, Colnodo

 

-Dafne Sabanes Plou, Argentina, individual

 

-Jose Arce, Argentina, Individual

 

-Joao Carlos Caribe, Brazil, Movimento Mega

 

-AHM Bazlur Rahman, Bangladesh, Bangladesh NGOs Network for Radio & Communication

 

-Jorge Gonzalez, Venezuela, UCLA

 

-Maritza Aguero, Peru , Individual

 

-Martín Porras, Perú, REDEM: Red Educativa Mundial

 

-Juan Manuel Rojas, Colombia, AGEIA DENSI Colombia

 

-Antonio Medina Gomez, Colombia, Asociación Colombiana de Usuarios de Internet

 

-Alfredo Velazco, Ecuador, Usuarios Digitales - @UsuariosDigital

 

-Raitme Citterio, Venezuela, Isoc Venezuela

 

-Mauro Cambronero, Argentina, Individual

 

-Gonzalo López Peña, Argentina, Ageia Densi

 

-Franco Moya, Argentina, AGEIA DENSI

 

-Marcela Tintilay, Argentina, Individual

 

-Carlos Dionisio Aguirre, Argentina, AGEIA DENSI - ADIAR

 

-Sergio Salinas Porto Argentina, Asociación Argentina de Usuarios de Internet (Internauta Argentina)

 

-Juan Parada, Colombia, UNAD

 

-Yenny Villalba, Paraguay, POJOAJU

 

-José Huerta, Chile, ONG Cívico

 

-Nicolas Caballero, Paraguay , ISOC-Paraguay

 

-Paula Penagos, Colombia, Población Civil

 

-Encel Sanchez, Venezuela, Universidad de Los Andes

 

-Adrian Quesada Rodriguez, Costa Rica, Universidad de Costa Rica

 

-Cynthia SOLIS, México, Ageia Densi México

 

-Maricarmen Sequera, Paraguay, TEDIC.org

 

-Natalia Enciso, Paraguay, APADIT

 

-Israel Rosas R., México, Individual

 

-Fatima Cambronero, Argentina, AGEIA DENSI Argentina

 

-Javier Pallero , Argentina, AGEIA DENSI Argentina



 

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